Goodnight 35

35mm film, plastic, resin, marble.
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ARTWORK: Wheat Field With Crows

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Wheat field With Crows

Wheat Field With Crows by Van Gogh

Viewers of Goodnight 35 may be reminded of Van Gogh’s painting Wheat Field With Crows. Both works use a similar auburn color and the black shapes in Timpson’s work are reminiscent of the shapes Van Gogh uses in his painting to depict the black crows. When asked about this connection Timpson responded that Van Gogh’s painting was an inspiration for Goodnight 35. This connection to Wheat Field With Crows helps strengthen the central message communicated by Goodnight 35. Goodnight 35 was created by burning holes into 35 millimeter film and is a comment on how digital photography has pushed 35 millimeter film into obsolescence. Van Gogh’s Field With Crows was one of the last paintings completed by Van Gogh before he died.

-Uploaded by Junius Wright




Goodnight 35: The Lament of The 35mm

My personal adaption of Goodnight 35 relies heavily on the use of symbolism in the artwork. I believe that the burned 35mm film appears to be a charred, burned out and dead landscape, devoid of life. The birds appearance serves to show that at least some creatures have managed to survive in this desolate world, although they are probably becoming fewer and more and more difficult to find. The charred desolate landscape represents the use of 35mm film in artwork, which has been largely discontinued. The birds serve to represent those few who persist in it's use, despite it becoming a dying breed of photography, though they are likely becoming fewer and fewer.

-Uploaded by Daniel Kennedy



Artwork: The Batman

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The first thing that came to mind when viewing this piece was the birds escaping from something ominious, such as an impending demise or dark past. This quickly brought up the idea of the popular superhero batman who faced a dark childhood causing him to become a vigilante.

-Uploaded by Avery Nwokike

Film: Fantasia 2000

If you've ever seen Disney's Fantasia 2000, this looks almost exactly like the black butterflies. Take a look. They represent the evillness in the world and are damaging to the others. To me, this painting is ominous and shows a dark presence moving out of the shadows and emerging into the world. Submitted by Ian Duffy






Do Not Go Gentle Into that Good Night by Dylan Thomas
Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rage at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,

Because their words had forked no lightning they

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright

Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,

And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, 

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight

Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,

Curse, bless me now with your fierce tears, I pray. 

Do not go gentle into that good night. 
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

This poem, written by Dylan Thomas to his father as the father peacefully died, urges people to fight death, rather than gently accept their fate. While the painting by Van Gogh shows how he decided to die peacefully (assuming that his last painting reflected his view of death), Goodnight 35 depicts birds trying to escape their doom. At first the effort seems futile, however upon closer inspection we see that one bird has escaped the dark whole in the lower right, providing hope that one can win the fight, and that it is worth it not to go gentle into that good night.

-Uploaded by William Want

Blackbird by The Beatles

Blackbird singing in the dead of night
Take these broken wings and learn to fly
All your life
You were only waiting for this moment to arise

Black bird singing in the dead of night
Take these sunken eyes and learn to see
all your life
you were only waiting for this moment to be free

Blackbird fly, Blackbird fly
Into the light of the dark black night.

Blackbird fly, Blackbird fly
Into the light of the dark black night.

Blackbird singing in the dead of night
Take these broken wings and learn to fly
All your life
You were only waiting for this moment to arise,
You were only waiting for this moment to arise,
You were only waiting for this moment to arise
When viewing Goodnight 35, one may be reminded of the classic Beatle's song "Blackbird" sung by Paul McCartney. "Blackbird" was written by Paul McCartney about the Civil Rights movement in America. In both the piece by Ben Timpson and the Beatle's song, the bird flies from the darkness to the light, and the birds are misshapen or disfigured or have "broken wings." Also the birds are black, but that's a little more obvious.

-Uploaded by Ryan Mainous

Definition of "Goodnight"

Goodnight;
  • an expression of farewell used in parting at nighttime or when going to sleep.
  • a conventional expression of farewell, or, rarely, of greeting, used in the late afternoon, the evening, or at night, esp when departing to bed
  • Exclamation of surprise or irritation, as in Good night, Joe!

Ben probably intended the more common use of the definition of "goodnight" when referencing his painting; "an expression fo farewell used in parting at nighttime or when going to sleep." This is becuase his artwork reflects a darker view reminiscent of dusk, and the title would thus be saying "goodnight" to its viewers in the very traditional way. Also, bats suggest an eery theme, which adds a slightly less benign taste to this paintings title.

-Uploaded by John McGue